Culture

Miami exhibit explores Caribbean art and history from Haiti’s revolution to the present – The Daily Gazette


564804_391172854252196_2047943562_n One of the opening images in “Caribbean: Crossroads of the World” features a massive nuclear submarine breaking the surface off what appears to be a cold northern coastline, with evergreens that would never thrive in tropical weather.

The painting by Cuban-born Julio Larraz imagines the technological evolution of semi-submersibles already used in the tropics for drug smuggling. Curator Elvis Fuentes hung it next to three artworks depicting Haitians crowded onto crude boats, and together the images show a Caribbean on the move – still carrying the stains of slavery and smuggling, perhaps, but in no way restricted by geographical boundaries.

“People think of just the islands. The islands have their own name, the Antilles. The Caribbean is the sea. One of the concepts we’re developing in the show is wherever the water goes, we have to go,” said Fuentes, guest curator at Perez Art Museum Miami.

The survey of Caribbean art and history opening Friday includes more than 180 paintings, sculptures, photographs, videos and art installations. Fifty works have been added to the exhibit since its debut at three New York City museums two years ago.

It mixes historical artwork dating to Haiti’s revolution at the turn of the 19th century with contemporary pieces by living artists from the islands and elsewhere. via The Daily Gazette

531422_367652476604234_1708295936_n.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.