Around the World

From the Philippines to Haiti, Disaster Recovery is a Way of Life – NYTimes.com


For many millions of people living in the planet’s poorest, most populous places, a state of recovery from what used to be called “natural” disasters has become the norm, not some exceptional circumstance. The central Philippines, now reeling from the impact of Typhoon Haiyan, a super storm if ever there was one, are just the latest place in which huge human losses follow a disaster that, in a rich country, would almost assuredly mainly exact a financial toll. See Keith Bradsher’s wrenching reports here and here for details on the damage. And the immediate search and rescue efforts are just a warmup for years of relocation, recovery and rebuilding.

For another example, consider the continuing struggles of hundreds of thousands of Haitians nearly four years after the devastating Port au Prince earthquake. (A great start is “Years After Haiti Quake, Safe Housing Is a Dream for Many.”) They are half a world away, but in the same world in many ways. My 2011 piece on “The Varied Costs of Catastrophe” explains what’s up. via – NYTimes.com.

 

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